DFAT - which are one of the government's largest departments - have produced a fairly comprehensive analysis into the economic benefits of joint-hosting the tournament with New Zealand.

The 2023 World Cup is set to become the largest women's sport event ever hosted, with 32 teams qualifying for finals from 144 nations that enter qualification.

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Up from 24 teams in 2019 in France, the 2023 World Cup in Australia and New Zealand is set to attract a larger figure of travelling fans than the record-breaking French World Cup.

Some sources are predicting figures closer to the 7.7 million that attended the 2018 men's World Cup in Russia, due to the huge amount of travelling fans the women's World Cup attracts from the United States, which far exceed the numbers that country generates to the men's World Cup.

The economic benefits will reach virtually every corner of Australian industry, with tourism a particular bonanza set to potentially benefit from the over 1.12 billion viewers who watched in 2019. Although this figure is likely to raise substantially for the tournament's next iteration down under.

FFA is forecasting nearly $500 million worth of social and economic benefits to the country from hosting the event.

Particularly exciting for Australian football is the surge this is set to create in advertising and marketing interest for football across Australia, with DFAT noting "a significant increase in interest from local and international companies exploring sponsorship opportunities in football, at all levels."

The decision to award hosting rights has helped burgeon massive increases in grassroots and facilities funding, with Victoria recently garnering $28 million in football specific funding from the state government, in addition to funding for a 'Home of the Matildas' football centre in the state.

It's already leading to a huge increase in interest in the Matildas, who have quickly risen to become Australia's 'most loved and trusted' national team according to various research polls.

DFAT have also reported an increase in interest already among sports participation, with Australia set to increase theย 1.96 million football participants already playing the sport regularly.

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